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Practitioner's Guide to the European Convention on Human Rights, A (4th Revised edition)

Our Price: £159.00 
Author(s): Reid, Karen;
Classification(s): Human rights & civil liberties law;
Series: European Lawyer Reference Series
ISBN-13: 9780414042421
ISBN-10: 0414042425
Publication Date: 10 Jan 2012
Imprint: Sweet & Maxwell
Availability: In Print
Free Stock: In Stock
Average ratings assigned : 0. Rate this product / View all ratings and comments (0) Ratings / Reviews
Publisher: Sweet & Maxwell Ltd
Publication Country: United Kingdom
Binding: Hardback
Items: Contains Hardback
Pages: 915

This is a practical and detailed reference guide to the procedure for taking a case to the European Court of Human Rights (“ECtHR”). As well as explaining the principles of the European Convention on Human Rights (and its role in UK law), the book provides step-by-step guidance on the practices and procedures involved in bringing a case before the ECtHR, ensuring that practitioners have a comprehensive guide to practising in the Court.

The new edition will provide an update on the relevant procedures, case law and problem areas, as well as including a clear explanation of the organisation and structure of the ECtHR, the latest trends in case sources and topics, and coverage of key provisions and general principles organised by subject area.

The place of the European Convention within UK law continues to grow in importance and as we are offering a practical guide to the Court and its procedure, it is essential that we maintain a regular cycle for the book to ensure that our readers are up to date. The new edition will update the content with current practice and procedure and general principles, as well as including new case law and areas of importance (such as extraterritoriality/jurisdiction, electoral rights, torture issues which have arisen out of cases relating to the war on terrorism, and the right to life).

INTRODUCTION

Part I : PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE

  1. Procedure before the European Court of Human Rights
    1. The Court
    2. Outline of Procedure
    3. Interim relief
    4. Legal aid and representation
  2. Admissibility checklist
  3. Convention Principles
  4. Sources of case-law

Part II: 
PROBLEM AREAS

General principles –
fairness
- Criminal charge
- Civil rights and obligations
Access
Adequate time
Appeals
Costs in court
Double jeopardy
Entrapment and agents provocateurs
Equality of arms
Evidence
Independence and impartiality
Information about the charge
Interpretation
Juries
Legal aid in civil cases
Legal representation in criminal proceedings
Legislative interference
Length of proceedings
Presence in court
Presumption of innocence
Public hearing and judgment
Reasons for decisions
Retrospectivity
Right to silence
Sentencing
Tribunal established by law
Witnesses 

III Other

Abortion
Aids
Armed Forces
Arrest
Childcare
Compensation for detention
Corporal punishment
Defamation and the right to reputation
Deprivation of liberty
Derogation: states of emergency
Detention pending extradition and expulsion
Discrimination
Education
Electoral rights
Environment
Euthanasia
Expropriation, confiscation and control of use
Extradition
Forced labour
Freedom of assembly
Freedom of association
Freedom of expression
Freedom of movement
Gypsies and minorities
Hindrance in the exercise of the right of individual petition
Home
Homosexuality
Housing and tenancy
Immigration and expulsion
Interception of communications
Marriage and founding a family
Mental health
Pensions
Planning and use of property
Pre-trial detention
Prisoners’
rights
Private life
Property
Reasons for arrest and detention
Religion, thought and conscience
Remedies
Review of detention
Right to life
Surveillance and secret files
Tax
Torture, inhuman and degrading treatment
Transsexuals
Welfare benefits 



IV. JUST SATISFACTION

A. General principles
B. 
Pecuniary loss
C. Non-pecuniary loss
D. Legal costs and expenses
E. Default interest

APPENDICES

  1. The 1950 European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
  2. Dates of entry into force
  3. Article 63 declaration
  4. Application form and explanatory note
  5. Legal aid rates
  6. Practice directions

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